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Groovy: A Tool for Data Auditing?

I came across an interesting article about Groovy scripting in the latest Oracle Enterprise Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (EPBCS) release. (After all, who wouldn't click on something entitled "Along Came Groovy!") The ideas about using Groovy to allow users to load "last saved by" information to view data changes were intriguing, and it looks like it can be done using Outline Load utility (OLU) in my on-premises application. Having these capabilities could be helpful for data auditing purposes. 

I plan to investigate how to use Groovy features and thought others might like to know about them as well.

In addition, I'm curious to know if anyone has been using these features in their own environments. Please leave your comments to share.

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Comments 1

Jason Jones on Thursday, 03 August 2017 12:32

I haven't been using Groovy exactly in this capacity (PBCS) but I have worked extensively with Java in general and in particular Java with Essbase/PBCS. I think the adoption and embrace of Groovy in the Oracle world in the last few years is a very exciting development. In my talks I often refer to it as "Java's cooler, younger cousin -- with less boilerplate code". Java doesn't necessarily lend itself to some of the things that Groovy is great for because Groovy makes some assumptions and provides some very convenient defaults, allowing for Groovy to be used with things like PBCS/EPBCS with great ease.

I plan to do some work with Groovy and the PBCS REST API, as well as play around with how Groovy can be used within PBCS itself, as it looks like it could be a very powerful and convenient way to accomplish certain tasks.

I haven't been using Groovy exactly in this capacity (PBCS) but I have worked extensively with Java in general and in particular Java with Essbase/PBCS. I think the adoption and embrace of Groovy in the Oracle world in the last few years is a very exciting development. In my talks I often refer to it as "Java's cooler, younger cousin -- with less boilerplate code". Java doesn't necessarily lend itself to some of the things that Groovy is great for because Groovy makes some assumptions and provides some very convenient defaults, allowing for Groovy to be used with things like PBCS/EPBCS with great ease. I plan to do some work with Groovy and the PBCS REST API, as well as play around with how Groovy can be used within PBCS itself, as it looks like it could be a very powerful and convenient way to accomplish certain tasks.
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Thursday, 17 August 2017